sfz File Format

By: Cakewalk, Development
Filed Under: Specifications

The sfz Format: Basics

What is the sfz format?

The sfz format is a file format to define how a collection of samples are arragned for performance.

The goal behind the sfz format is to provide a free, simple, minimalistic and expandable format to arrange, distribute and use audio samples with the highest possible quality and the highest possible performance flexibility.

A sfz format file can be played in our freeware sfz player.

Soundware, software and hardware developers can create, use and distribute the sfz format files for free, for either free or commercial applications.

Some of the features of the sfz format are:

  • Samples of any bit depth (8/16/24/32-bit) support, mono or stereo
  • Samples taken at any samplerate (i.e. 44.1k, 48k, 88.2k, 96k, 176.4k, 192k, 384k)
  • Compressed samples. Compressed and uncompressed can be combined
  • Looped samples
  • Unlimited keyboard splits and layers
  • Unlimited velocity splits and layers
  • Unlimited regions of sample playback based on MIDI controllers (continuous controllers, pitch bend, channel and polyphonic aftertouch, keyboard switches) and internal generators (random, sequence counters)
  • Sample playback on MIDI control events
  • Unlimited unidirectional and bidirectional exclusive regions (mute groups)
  • Unlimited release trigger regions with release trigger attenuation control
  • Unlimited crossfade controls
  • Trigger on first-note and legato notes
  • Sample playback synchronized to host tempo
  • Dedicated Envelope Generators for pitch, filter and amplifier
  • Dedicated LFO for pitch, filter and amplifier

How is the sfz format structured?

The sfz format is a collection of sample files plus one or multiple .sfz definition files. This structure, containing multiple files instead of a single file is defined as non-monolithic.

Two kinds of sample files were selected to be included in the sfz format: a basic PCM uncompressed format (standard Windows wave files) and a basic, adjustable-quality, royalty free compressed format (ogg-vorbis encoded files).

The inclusion of a compressed format allows sample developers and soundware creators to easily create preview or demonstration files in a small package so they can be transferred with minimum bandwidth, while retaining complete performance functionality.

Both formats are 100% royalty-free, so players can be created to reproduce them without fixed or per-copy fees. They can also be freely distributed on the web (provided that the contents of the files are copyright cleared).

Each .sfz definition file represents one or a collection of instruments. An instrument is defined as a collection of regions. Regions include the definition for the input controls, the samples (the wav/ogg files) and the performance parameters to play those samples.

How is the .sfz definition file created?

A .sfz definition file is just a text file. Consequently, it can be created by using any text editor (i.e. Notepad).

Why non-monolithic?

While both monolithic and non-monolithic formats have advantages and disadvantages, there are several reasons which moved us to adopt a non-monolithic sample format. Technological and conceptual reasons can hardly be separated, so here's a basic explanation.

The most important reason is the file size limitation of a non-monolitic file on FAT32 partitions. Samples are getting really big nowadays, with thousands of individual samples collected in single instruments, and triggered according to many input control combinations.

Samples with high bit resolution (i.e. 24-bit samples) and high samplerate settings (96kHz, 192kHz) make the collection size even bigger. In the case of a non-monolithic format, the limitation still applies, but it applies to each sample instead of to the sum of all samples, making the limit virtually unreachable.

While this limitation doesn't apply to NTFS, NTFS partitions are less efficient than FAT32 disks in terms of raw disk performance for streaming applications.

Additionally, editing a single sample in a monolithic file implies loading the whole file, and after edit, saving the whole file again to disk. When collection size is big, the loading and saving operation is very time-consuming.

However, we have not discharged the possibility of incorporating a monolithic format for the sfz format, as soon as the format structure is completely implemented. Small sound sets (or NTFS users) could chose between the two options appropriately.

Why not XML?

XML was actually the first choice for the .sfz definition file, mainly due the simplicity from the development point of view as the XML parser and transaction code is already available.

However, XML was designed to exchange data over the web. Musicians, players, composers, soundware developers and audio technicians generally do not know about XML at all.

In addition, as a universal information exchange format designed for general-purpose applications, XML is inefficient (in terms of information over total data terms), and editing a XML file requires the use of a XML editor instead of a text editor.

A .sfz file is extremely self-explanatory. Most of the functionality of an instrument can be easily discovered by reading the file.

Is there a .sfz dedicated editor?

From rgc:audio, not yet... and not anytime soon.
However, we're working with several developers in the industry, creators of sample-conversion software to implement the .sfz format in their converters and editors.

The nature of the format allows creating instruments using other general-purpose software, like spreadsheets, wordprocessors, simple-scripting languages and other custom tailored software applications.

Implementation

How is an instrument defined?

The basic component of an instrument is a region. An instrument then, is defined by one or more regions. Multiple regions can be arranged in a group. Groups allow entering common parameters for multiple regions.

A region can include three main components: the definition for a sample, a set of input controls and a set of performance parameters.

Sample

The sample opcode defines which sample file will be played when the region is defined to play.
If a sample opcode is not present in the region, the region will play the sample defined in the last <group>. If there's no previous group defined, or if the previous group doesn't specify a sample opcode, the region will be ignored.

Input Controls

Input controls define when the sample defined in a region will play, based in real-world controller values and/or internally calculated values.

Real-world controllers are the elements that players, musicians or composers actually use to play music. Internal values are calculated by the player, like sequence counters and random generators.

The sfz format relies in the standard Musical Instruments Digital Interface (MIDI) specification for all input controls. Most available performance controllers implement MIDI, and it's still the dominating specification for software audio sequencers in all platforms.

Keyboard controllers are the most significant example of an Input Controls generator. Other generators could be MIDI guitars and string instruments, wind controllers, drum and percussion controllers. With individual differences, they all generate a common set of messages defined in the MIDI specification.

A set of input controls then, are the combination of a played MIDI note with its velocity, continuous controllers, pitch bend, channel and polyphonic aftertouch, etc.

When a particular set of input controls matches the definition for a region, the sample specified in that region plays, using a particular set of performance parameters also specified in the region.

Inside the definition file, a region starts with the <region> header. A region is defined between two <region> headers, or between a <region> header and a <group> header, or between a <region> header and the end of the file.

Following the <region> header one or more opcodes can be defined. The opcodes are special keywords which instruct the player on what, when and how to play a sample.

Opcodes within a region can appear in any order, and they have to be separated by one or more spaces or tabulation controls. Opcodes can appear in separated lines within a region.

Opcodes and assigned opcode values are separated by the equal to sign (=), without spaces between the opcode and the sign. For instance:

sample=trombone_a4_ff.wav
sample=cello_a5_pp first take.wav

are valid examples, while:

sample = cello_a4_pp.wav

Is not (note the spaces at the sides of the = sign).
Input Controls and Performance Parameters opcodes are optional, so they might not be present in the definition file. An 'expectable' default value for each parameter is pre-defined, and will be used if there's no definition.

Example region definitions:

<region> sample=440.wav

This region definition instructs the player to play the sample file '440.wav' for the whole keyboard range.

<region> lokey=64 hikey=67 sample=440.wav

This region features a very basic set of input parameters (lokey and hikey, which represent the low and high MIDI notes in the keyboard), and the sample definition.
This instructs the player to play the sample '440.wav', if a key in the 64-67 range is played.

It is very important to note that all Input Controls defined in a region act using the AND boolean operator. Consequently, all conditions must be matched for the region to play. For instance:

<region> lokey=64 hikey=67 lovel=0 hivel=34 locc1=0 hicc1=40 sample=440.wav

This region definition instructs the player to play the sample '440.wav' if there is an incoming note event in the 64-67 range AND the note has a velocity in the 0~34 range AND last modulation wheel (cc1) message was in the 0~40 range.

Performance parameters

The Performance Parameters define how the sample specified will play, once the region is defined to play.
A simple example of a Performance Parameter is volume. It defines how loud the sample will be played when the region plays.

Groups

As previously stated, groups allow entering common parameters for multiple regions. A group is defined with the <group> opcode, and the parameters enumerated on it last till the next group opcode, or till the end of the file.

<group>
ampeg_attack=0.04 ampeg_release=0.45

<region> sample=trumpet_pp_c4.wav key=c4
<region> sample=trumpet_pp_c#4.wav key=c#4
<region> sample=trumpet_pp_d4.wav key=d4
<region> sample=trumpet_pp_d#4.wav key=d#4

<group>
<region> sample=trumpet_pp_e4.wav key=e4 // previous group parameters reset

Comments

Comment lines can be inserted anywhere inside the file. A comment line starts with the slash character ('/'), and it extends till the end of the line.

<region>
sample=trumpet_pp_c4.wav
// middle C in the keyboard
lokey=60
// pianissimo layer
lovel=0 hivel=20 // another comment

Where do the sample files have to be stored?

Sample files can be stored either in the same folder where the .sfz definition file resides, or in any alternative route, specified relatively to the location of the definition file. Consequently:

sample=trumpet_pp_c3.wav
sample=samples\trumpet_pp_c3.wav
sample=..\trumpet_pp_c3.wav

Are all valid sample names.

Alternatively, the player might specify one or several 'user folders', where it will search for samples if it doesn't find them in the same folder as the definition file.

What can the sfz format do?

The sfz format is aimed to allow the arrange of a sample collection in a flexible and expandable way. It's up to the player to decide which functionality it wants to implement.

Units

All units in the sfz format are in real-world values. Frequencies are expressed in Hertz, pitches in cents, amplitudes in percentage and volumes in decibels.
Notes are expressed in MIDI Note Numbers, or in note names according to the International Pitch Notation (IPN) convention. According to this rules, middle C in the keyboard is C4 and the MIDI note number 60.

Opcode List

The following is a description of all valid opcodes for the sfz format version 1.0:

Opcode
Description
Type
Default
Range
Sample Definition
sample

This opcode defines which sample file the region will play.
The value of this opcode is the filename of the sample file, including the extension. The filename must be stored in the same folder where the definition file is, or specified relatively to it.

If the sample file is not found, the player will ignore the whole region contents.

Long names and names with blank spaces and other special characters (excepting the = character) are allowed in the sample definition.

The sample will play unchanged when a note equal to the pitch_keycenter opcode value is played. If pitch_keycenter is not defined for the region, sample will play unchanged on note 60 (middle C).

Examples:
sample=guitar_c4_ff.wav
sample=dog kick.ogg
sample=out of tune trombone (redundant).wav
sample=staccatto_snare.ogg

string
(filename)
n/a n/a
Input Controls
lochan
hichan

If incoming notes have a MIDI channel between lochan and hichan, the region will play.

Examples:
lochan=1 hichan=5

integer
lochan=1
hichan=16
1 to 16
lokey
hikey
key

If a note equal to or higher than lokey AND equal to or lower than hikey is played, the region will play.

lokey and hikey can be entered in either MIDI note numbers (0 to 127) or in MIDI note names (C-1 to G9)

The key opcode sets lokey, hikey and pitch_keycenter to the same note.

Examples:
lokey=60 // middle C
hikey=63 // middle D#
lokey=c4 // middle C
hikey=d#4 // middle D#
hikey=eb4 // middle Eb (D#)

integer
lokey=0, hikey=127
0 to 127
C-1 to G9
lovel
hivel
If a note with velocity value equal to or higher than lovel AND equal to or lower than hivel is played, the region will play.
integer

locc=0, hicc=127

for all controllers

0 to 127

lobend
hibend

Defines the range of the last Pitch Bend message required for the region to play.

Examples:
lobend=0 hibend=4000

The region will play only if last Pitch Bend message received was in the 0~4000 range.

integer
lobend=-8192,
hibend=8192
-8192 to 8192
lochanaft
hichanaft

Defines the range of last Channel Aftertouch message required for the region to play.

Examples:
lochanaft=30 hichanaft=100

The region will play only if last Channel Aftertouch message received was in the 30~100 range.

integer
lochanaft=0, hichanaft=127
0 to 127
lopolyaft
hipolyaft

Defines the range of last Polyphonic Aftertouch message required for the region to play.

The incoming note information in the Polyphonic Aftertouch message is not relevant.

Examples:
lopolyaft=30 hipolyaft=100

The region will play only if last Polyphonic Aftertouch message received was in the 30~100 range.

integer
lopolyaft=0, hipolyaft=127
0 to 127
lorand
hirand

Random values. The player will generate a new random number on every note-on event, in the range 0~1.

The region will play if the random number is equal to or higher than lorand, and lower than hirand.

Examples:
lorand=0.2 hirand=0.4
lorand=0.4 hirand=1

floating point
lorand = 0
hirand = 1
0 to 1
lobpm
hibpm

Host tempo value. The region will play if the host tempo is equal to or higher than lobpm, and lower than hibpm.

Examples:
lobpm=0 hibpm=100
lobpm=100 hibpm=200.5

floating point
lobpm = 0
hibpm = 500
0 to 500 bpm
seq_length

Sequence length. The player will keep an internal counter creating a consecutive note-on sequence for each region, starting at 1 and resetting at seq_length.

Examples:
seq_length=3

integer
1
1 to 100
seq_position

Sequence position. The region will play if the internal sequence counter is equal to seq_position.

Examples:
seq_length=4 seq_position=2

In above example, the region will play on the second note every four notes.

integer
1
1 to 100
sw_lokey
sw_hikey

Defines the range of the keyboard to be used as trigger selectors for the sw_last opcode.

sw_lokey and sw_hikey can be entered in either MIDI note numbers (0 to 127) or in MIDI note names (C-1 to G9)

Examples:
sw_lokey=48 sw_hikey=53

integer
sw_lokey=0, sw_hikey=127
0 to 127
C-1 to G9
sw_last

Enables the region to play if the last key pressed in the range specified by sw_lokey and sw_hikey is equal to the sw_last value.

sw_last can be entered in either MIDI note numbers (0 to 127) or in MIDI note names (C-1 to G9)

Examples:
sw_last=49

integer
0
0 to 127
C-1 to G9
sw_down

Enables the region to play if the key equal to sw_down value is depressed.

Key has to be in the range specified by sw_lokey and sw_hikey.

sw_down can be entered in either MIDI note numbers (0 to 127) or in MIDI note names (C-1 to G9)

Examples:
sw_down=Cb3

integer
0
0 to 127
C-1 to G9
sw_up

Enables the region to play if the key equal to sw_up value is not depressed.

Key has to be in the range specified by sw_lokey and sw_hikey.

sw_up can be entered in either MIDI note numbers (0 to 127) or in MIDI note names (C-1 to G9)

Examples:
sw_up=49

integer
0
0 to 127
C-1 to G9
sw_previous

Previous note value. The region will play if last note-on message was equal to sw_previous value.

sw_previous can be entered in either MIDI note numbers (0 to 127) or in MIDI note names (C-1 to G9)

Examples:
sw_previous=60

integer
none
0 to 127
C-1 to G9
sw_vel

This opcode allows overriding the velocity for the region with the velocity of the previous note. Values can be:

current: Region uses the velocity of current note.

previous: Region uses the velocity of the previous note.

Examples:
sw_vel=previous

text
current
current, previous
trigger

Sets the trigger which will be used for the sample to play. Values can be:

attack (default): Region will play on note-on.
release: Region will play on note-off. The velocity used to play the note-off sample is the velocity value of the corresponding (previous) note-on message.
first: Region will play on note-on, but if there's no other note going on (staccato, or first note in a legato phrase).
legato: Region will play on note-on, but only if there's a note going on (notes after first note in a legato phrase).

Examples:
trigger=release

integer
attack
attack,
release, first, legato
group

Exclusive group number for this region.

Examples:
group=3
group=334

integer
0
0 to 4Gb (4294967296)
off_by

Region off group. When a new region with a group number equal to off_by plays, this region will be turned off.

Examples:
off_by=3
off_by=334

integer
0
0 to 4Gb (4294967296)
off_mode

Region off mode. This opcode will determinate how a region is turned off by an off_by opcode. Values can be:

fast (default): The voice will be turned off immediately. Release settings will not have any effect.

normal: The region will be set into release stage. All envelope generators will enter in release stage, and region will expire when the amplifier envelope generator expired.

Examples:
off_mode=fast
off_mode=normal

text
fast
fast, normal
on_loccN
on_hiccN

Sample trigger on MIDI continuous control N. If a MIDI control message with a value between on_loccN and on_hiccN is received, the region will play.

Examples:
on_locc1=0 on_hicc1=0

Region will play when a MIDI CC1 (modulation wheel) message with zero value is received.

integer
-1 (unassigned)
0 to 127
Performance Parameters
Sample Player
delay

Region delay time, in seconds.
If a delay value is specified, the region playback will be postponed for the specified time.
If the region receives a note-off message before delay time, the region won't play.

All envelope generators delay stage will start counting after region delay time.

Examples:
delay=1
delay=0.2

floating point
0
0 to 100 seconds
delay_random

Region random delay time, in seconds.
If the region receives a note-off message before delay time, the region won't play.

Examples:
delay_random=1
delay_random=0.2

floating point
0
0 to 100 seconds
delay_ccN

Region delay time after MIDI continuous controller N messages are received, in seconds.
If the region receives a note-off message before delay time, the region won't play.

Examples:
delay_cc1=1
delay_cc2=.5

floating point
0
0 to 100 seconds
offset

The offset used to play the sample, in sample units.
The player will reproduce samples starting with the very first sample in the file, unless offset is specified. It will start playing the file at the offset sample in this case.

Examples:
offset=3000
offset=32425

integer
0
0 to 4 Gb (4294967296)
offset_random

Random offset added to the region offset, in sample units.

Examples:
offset_random=300
offset_random=100

integer
0
0 to 4 Gb (4294967296)
offset_ccN

The offset used to play the sample according to last position of MIDI continuous controller N, in sample units.

This opcode is useful to specify an alternate sample start point based on MIDI controllers.

Examples:
offset_cc1=3000
offset_cc64=1388

integer
0
0 to 4 Gb (4294967296)
end

The endpoint of the sample, in sample units.
The player will reproduce the whole sample if end is not specified.

If end value is -1, the sample will not play. Marking a region end with -1 can be used to use a silent region to turn off other regions by using the group and off_by opcodes.

Examples:
end=133000
end=4432425

integer
0
-1 to 4 Gb (4294967296)
count

The number of times the sample will be played. If this opcode is specified, the sample will restart as many times as defined. Envelope generators will not be retriggered on sample restart.
When this opcode is defined, loopmode is automatically set to one_shot.

Examples:
count=3
count=2

integer
0
0 to 4 Gb (4294967296)
loop_mode

If loop_mode is not specified, each sample will play according to its predefined loop mode. That is, the player will play the sample looped using the first defined loop, if available. If no loops are defined, the wave will play unlooped.

The loop_mode opcode allows playing samples with loops defined in the unlooped mode. The possible values are:

no_loop: no looping will be performed. Sample will play straight from start to end, or until note off, whatever reaches first.
one_shot: sample will play from start to end, ignoring note off.
This mode is engaged automatically if the count opcode is defined.
loop_continuous: once the player reaches sample loop point, the loop will play until note expiration.
loop_sustain: the player will play the loop while the note is held, by keeping it depressed or by using the sustain pedal (CC64). The rest of the sample will play after note release.

Examples:
loop_mode=no_loop
loop_mode=loop_continuous

text
no_loop for samples without a loop defined,
loop_continuous for samples with defined loop(s).
n/a
loop_start

The loop start point, in samples.

If loop_start is not specified and the sample has a loop defined, the sample start point will be used.

If loop_start is specified, it will overwrite the loop start point defined in the sample.

This opcode will not have any effect if loopmode is set to no_loop.

Examples:
loop_start=4503
loop_start=12445

integer
0
0 to 4 Gb (4294967296)
loop_end

The loop end point, in samples. This opcode will not have any effect if loopmode is set to no_loop.

If loop_end is not specified and the sample have a loop defined, the sample loop end point will be used.

If loop_end is specified, it will overwrite the loop end point defined in the sample.

Examples:
loop_end=34503
loop_end=212445

integer
0
0 to 4 Gb (4294967296)
sync_beats
Region playing synchronization to host position.

When sync_beats is specified and after input controls instruct the region to play, the playback will be postponed until the next multiple of the specified value is crossed.

Examples:
sync_beats=4

In this example, if note is pressed in beat 2 of current track, note won't be played until beat 4 reaches.

This opcode will only work in hosts featuring song position information (vstTimeInfo ppqPos).
floating point
0
0 to 32 beats
sync_offset
Region playing synchronization to host position offset.

When sync_beats is specified and after input controls instruct the region to play, the playback will be postponed until the next multiple of the specified value plus the sync_offset value is crossed.

Examples:
sync_beats=4 sync_offset=1

In this example, if note is pressed in beat 2 of current track, note won't be played until beat 5 reaches.

This opcode will only work in hosts featuring song position information (vstTimeInfo ppqPos).
floating point
0
0 to 32 beats
Pitch
transpose
The transposition value for this region which will be applied to the sample.

Examples:
transpose=3
transpose=-4
integer
0
-127 to 127
tune
The fine tuning for the sample, in cents. Range is ±1 semitone, from -100 to 100. Only negative values must be prefixed with sign.

Examples:
tune=33
tune=-30
tune=94
integer
0
-100 to 100
pitch_keycenter
Root key for the sample.

Examples:
pitch_keycenter=56
pitch_keycenter=c#2
integer
60 (C4)
-127 to 127
C-1 to G9
pitch_keytrack
Within the region, this value defines how much the pitch changes with every note. Default value is 100, which means pitch will change one hundred cents (one semitone) per played note.
Setting this value to zero means that all notes in the region will play the same pitch, particularly useful when mapping drum sounds.

Examples:
pitch_keytrack=20
pitch_keytrack=0
integer
100
-1200 to 1200
pitch_veltrack
Pitch velocity tracking, represents how much the pitch changes with incoming note velocity, in cents.

Examples:
pitch_veltrack=0
pitch_veltrack=1200
integer
0
-9600 to 9600 cents
pitch_random
Random tuning for the region, in cents. Random pitch will be centered, with positive and negative values.

Examples:
pitch_random=100
pitch_random=400
integer
0
0 to 9600 cents
bend_up
Pitch bend range when Bend Wheel or Joystick is moved up, in cents.

Examples:
bend_up=1200
bend_up=100
integer
200
-9600 to 9600
bend_down
Pitch bend range when Bend Wheel or Joystick is moved down, in cents.

Examples:
bend_down=1200
bend_down=100
integer
-200

bend_step
Pitch bend step, in cents.

Examples:
bend_step=100 // glissando in semitones
bend_step=200 // glissando in whole tones
integer
1
1 to 1200
Pitch EG
pitcheg_delay
Pitch EG delay time, in seconds. This is the time elapsed from note on to the start of the Attack stage.

Examples:
pitcheg_delay=1.5
pitcheg_delay=0
floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
pitcheg_start
Pitch EG start level, in percentage.

Examples:
pitcheg_start=20
pitcheg_start=100
floating point
0 %
0 to 100 %
pitcheg_attack
Pitch EG attack time, in seconds.

Examples:
pitcheg_attack=1.2
pitcheg_attack=0.1
floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
pitcheg_hold
Pitch EG hold time, in seconds. During the hold stage, EG output will remain at its maximum value.

Examples:
pitcheg_hold=1.5
pitcheg_hold=0.1
floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
pitcheg_decay

Pitch EG decay time, in seconds.


Examples:
pitcheg_decay=1.5
pitcheg_decay=3

floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
pitcheg_sustain
Pitch EG release time (after note release), in seconds.

Examples:
pitcheg_release=1.34
pitcheg_release=2
floating point
100 %
0 to 100 %
pitcheg_release
Pitch EG release time (after note release), in seconds.

Examples:
pitcheg_release=1.34
pitcheg_release=2
floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
pitcheg_depth
Depth for the pitch EG, in cents.

Examples:
pitcheg_depth=1200
pitcheg_depth=-100
integer
0
-12000 to 12000
pitcheg_vel2delay
Velocity effect on pitch EG delay time, in seconds.

Examples:
pitcheg_vel2delay=1.2
pitcheg_vel2delay=0.1

Delay time will be calculated as

delay time = pitcheg_delay
+ pitcheg_vel2delay * velocity / 127
floating point
0 seconds
-100 to 100 seconds
pitcheg_vel2attack
Velocity effect on pitch EG attack time, in seconds.

Examples:
pitcheg_vel2attack=1.2
pitcheg_vel2attack=0.1

Attack time will be calculated as

attack time = pitcheg_attack
+ pitcheg_vel2attack * velocity / 127
floating point
0 seconds
-100 to 100 seconds
pitcheg_vel2hold
Velocity effect on pitch EG hold time, in seconds.

Examples:
pitcheg_vel2hold=1.2
pitcheg_vel2hold=0.1

Hold time will be calculated as

hold time = pitcheg_hold
+ pitcheg_vel2hold * velocity / 127
floating point
0 seconds
-100 to 100 seconds
pitcheg_vel2decay
Velocity effect on pitch EG decay time, in seconds.

Examples:
pitcheg_vel2decay=1.2
pitcheg_vel2decay=0.1

Decay time will be calculated as

decay time = pitcheg_decay
+ pitcheg_vel2decay * velocity / 127
floating point
0 seconds
-100 to 100 seconds
pitcheg_vel2sustain
Velocity effect on pitch EG sustain level, in percentage.

Examples:
pitcheg_vel2sustain=30
pitcheg_vel2sustain=20

Sustain level will be calculated as

sustain level = pitcheg_sustain
+ pitcheg_vel2sustain
floating point
0 %
-100 % to 100 %
pitcheg_vel2release
Velocity effect on pitch EG release time, in seconds.

Examples:
pitcheg_vel2release=1.2
pitcheg_vel2release=0.1

Release time will be calculated as

release time = pitcheg_release
+ pitcheg_vel2release * velocity / 127
floating point
0 seconds
-100 to 100 seconds
pitcheg_vel2depth

Velocity effect on pitch EG depth, in cents.

Examples:
pitcheg_vel2depth=100
pitcheg_vel2depth=-1200

integer
0 cents
-12000 to 12000 cents
Pitch LFO
pitchlfo_delay
The time before the Pitch LFO starts oscillating, in seconds.

Examples:
pitchlfo_delay=1
pitchlfo_delay=0.4
floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
pitchlfo_fade
Pitch LFO fade-in effect time.

Examples:
pitchlfo_fade=1
pitchlfo_fade=0.4
floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
pitchlfo_freq
Pitch LFO frequency, in hertz.

Examples:
pitchlfo_freq=0.4
pitchlfo_freq=1.3
floating point
0 Hertz
0 to 20 hertz
pitchlfo_depth
Pitch LFO depth, in cents.

Examples:
pitchlfo_depth=1
pitchlfo_depth=4
integer
0 cent
-1200 to 1200 cents
pitchlfo_depthccN
Pitch LFO depth when MIDI continuous controller N is received, in cents.

Examples:
pitchlfo_depthcc1=100
pitchlfo_depthcc32=400
integer
0 cent
-1200 to 1200 cents
pitchlfo_depthchanaft Pitch LFO depth when channel aftertouch MIDI messages are received, in cents.

Examples:
pitchlfo_depthchanaft=100
pitchlfo_depthchanaft=400
integer
0 cent
-1200 to 1200 cents
pitchlfo_depthpolyaft Pitch LFO depth when polyphonic aftertouch MIDI messages are received, in cents.

Examples:
pitchlfo_depthpolyaft=100
pitchlfo_depthpolyaft=400
integer
0 cent
-1200 to 1200 cents
pitchlfo_freqccN
Pitch LFO frequency change when MIDI continuous controller N is received, in hertz.

Examples:
pitchlfo_freqcc1=5
pitchlfo_freqcc1=-12
floating point
0 hertz
-200 to 200 hertz
pitchlfo_freqchanaft
Pitch LFO frequency change when channel aftertouch MIDI messages are received, in hertz.

Examples:
pitchlfo_freqchanaft=10
pitchlfo_freqchanaft=-40
floating point
0 hertz
-200 to 200 hertz
pitchlfo_freqpolyaft Pitch LFO frequency change when polyphonic aftertouch MIDI messages are received, in hertz.

Examples:
pitchlfo_freqpolyaft=10
pitchlfo_freqpolyaft=-4
floating point
0 hertz
-200 to 200 hertz
Filter
fil_type

Filter type. Avaliable types are:

lpf_1p: one-pole low pass filter (6dB/octave).
hpf_1p: one-pole high pass filter (6dB/octave).
lpf_2p: two-pole low pass filter (12dB/octave).
hpf_2p: two-pole high pass filter (12dB/octave).
bpf_2p: two-pole band pass filter (12dB/octave).
brf_2p: two-pole band rejection filter (12dB/octave).

Examples:
fil_type=lpf_2p
fil_type=hpf_1p

text
lpf_2p
lpf_1p, hpf_1p, lpf_2p, hpf_2p, bpf_2p, brf_2p
cutoff

The filter cutoff frequency, in Hertz.

If the cutoff is not specified, the filter will be disabled, with the consequent CPU drop in the player.

Examples:
cutoff=343
cutoff=4333

floating point
filter disabled
0 to
SampleRate / 2
cutoff_ccN
The variation in the cutoff frequency when MIDI continuous controller N is received, in cents.

Examples:
cutoff_cc1=1200
cutoff_cc2=-100
integer
0
-9600 to 9600 cents
cutoff_chanaft
The variation in the cutoff frequency when MIDI channel aftertouch messages are received, in cents.

Examples:
cutoff_chanaft=1200
cutoff_chanaft=-100
integer
0
-9600 to 9600 cents
cutoff_polyaft
The variation in the cutoff frequency when MIDI polyphonic aftertouch messages are received, in cents.

Examples:
cutoff_polyaft=1200
cutoff_polyaft=-100
integer
0
-9600 to 9600 cents
resonance
The filter cutoff resonance value, in decibels.

Examples:
resonance=30
floating point
0 dB
0 to 40 dB
fil_keytrack
Filter keyboard tracking (change on cutoff for each key) in cents.

Examples:
fil_keytrack=100
fil_keytrack=0
integer
0 cents
0 to 1200 cents
fil_keycenter
Center key for filter keyboard tracking. In this key, the filter keyboard tracking will have no effect.

Examples:
fil_keycenter=60
fil_keycenter=48
integer
60
0 to 127
fil_veltrack
Filter velocity tracking, represents how much the cutoff changes with incoming note velocity.

Examples:
fil_veltrack=0
fil_veltrack=1200
integer
0
-9600 to 9600 cents
fil_random
Random cutoff added to the region, in cents.

Examples:
fil_random=100
fil_random=400
integer
0
0 to 9600 cents
Filter EG
fileg_delay
Filter EG delay time, in seconds. This is the time elapsed from note on to the start of the Attack stage.

Examples:
fileg_delay=1.5
fileg_delay=0
floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
fileg_start
Filter EG start level, in percentage.

Examples:
fileg_start=20
fileg_start=100
floating point
0 %
0 to 100 %
fileg_attack
Filter EG attack time, in seconds.

Examples:
fileg_attack=1.2
fileg_attack=0.1
floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
fileg_hold
Filter EG hold time, in seconds. During the hold stage, EG output will remain at its maximum value.

Examples:
fileg_hold=1.5
fileg_hold=0.1
floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
fileg_decay

Filter EG decay time, in seconds.

Examples:
fileg_decay=1.5
fileg_decay=3

floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
fileg_sustain
Filter EG sustain level, in percentage.

Examples:
fileg_sustain=40.34
fileg_sustain=10
floating point
100 %
0 to 100 %
fileg_release
Filter EG release time (after note release), in seconds.

Examples:
fileg_release=1.34
fileg_release=2
floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
fileg_depth
Depth for the filter EG, in cents.

Examples:
fileg_depth=1200
fileg_depth=-100
integer
0
-12000 to 12000
fileg_vel2delay
Velocity effect on filter EG delay time, in seconds.

Examples:
fileg_vel2delay=1.2
fileg_vel2delay=0.1

Delay time will be calculated as

delay time = fileg_delay
+ fileg_vel2delay * velocity / 127
floating point
0 seconds
-100 to 100 seconds
fileg_vel2attack
Velocity effect on filter EG attack time, in seconds.

Examples:
fil_vel2attack=1.2
fil_vel2attack=0.1

Attack time will be calculated as

attack time = fileg_attack
+ fileg_vel2attack * velocity / 127
floating point
0 seconds
-100 to 100 seconds
fileg_vel2hold
Velocity effect on filter EG hold time, in seconds.

Examples:
fileg_vel2hold=1.2
fileg_vel2hold=0.1

Hold time will be calculated as

hold time = fileg_hold
+ fileg_vel2hold * velocity / 127
floating point
0 seconds
-100 to 100 seconds
fileg_vel2decay
Velocity effect on filter EG decay time, in seconds.

Examples:
fileg_vel2decay=1.2
fileg_vel2decay=0.1

Decay time will be calculated as

decay time = fileg_decay
+ fileg_vel2decay * velocity / 127
floating point
0 seconds
-100 to 100 seconds
fileg_vel2sustain
Velocity effect on filter EG sustain level, in percentage.

Examples:
fileg_vel2sustain=30
fileg_vel2sustain=-30

Sustain level will be calculated as

sustain level = fileg_sustain
+ fileg_vel2sustain

Result will be clipped to 0~100%.
floating point
0 %
-100 % to 100 %
fileg_vel2release
Velocity effect on filter EG release time, in seconds.

Examples:
fileg_vel2release=1.2
fileg_vel2release=0.1

Release time will be calculated as

release time = fileg_release
+ fileg_vel2release * velocity / 127
floating point
0 seconds
-100 to 100 seconds
fileg_vel2depth
-12000 to 12000 cents
integer
0 cents
-12000 to 12000 cents
Filter LFO
fillfo_delay
The time before the filter LFO starts oscillating, in seconds.

Examples:
fillfo_delay=1
fillfo_delay=0.4
floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
fillfo_fade
Filter LFO fade-in effect time.

Examples:
fillfo_fade=1
fillfo_fade=0.4
floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
fillfo_freq
Filter LFO frequency, in hertz.

Examples:
fillfo_freq=0.4
fillfo_freq=1.3
floating point
0 Hertz
0 to 20 hertz
fillfo_depth
Filter LFO depth, in cents.

Examples:
fillfo_depth=1
fillfo_depth=4
floating point
0 dB
-1200 to 1200 cents
fillfo_depthccN
Filter LFO depth when MIDI continuous controller N is received, in cents.

Examples:
fillfo_depthcc1=100
fillfo_depthcc32=400
integer
0 cent
-1200 to 1200 cents
fillfo_depthchanaft
Filter LFO depth when channel aftertouch MIDI messages are received, in cents.

Examples:
fillfo_depthchanaft=100
fillfo_depthchanaft=400
integer
0 cent
-1200 to 1200 cents
fillfo_depthpolyaft
Filter LFO depth when polyphonic aftertouch MIDI messages are received, in cents.

Examples:
fillfo_depthpolyaft=100
fillfo_depthpolyaft=400
integer
0 cent
-1200 to 1200 cents
fillfo_freqccN
Filter LFO frequency change when MIDI continuous controller N is received, in hertz.

Examples:
fillfo_freqcc1=5
fillfo_freqcc1=-12
floating point
0 hertz
-200 to 200 hertz
fillfo_freqchanaft
Filter LFO frequency change when channel aftertouch MIDI messages are received, in hertz.

Examples:
fillfo_freqchanaft=10
fillfo_freqchanaft=-40
floating point
0 hertz
-200 to 200 hertz
fillfo_freqpolyaft
Filter LFO frequency change when polyphonic aftertouch MIDI messages are received, in hertz.

Examples:
fillfo_freqpolyaft=10
fillfo_freqpolyaft=-4
floating point
0 hertz
-200 to 200 hertz
Amplifier
volume
The volume for the region, in decibels.

Examples:
volume=-24
volume=0
volume=3.5
floating point
0.0
-144 to 6 dB
pan
The panoramic position for the region.

If a mono sample is used, pan value defines the position in the stereo image where the sample will be placed.
When a stereo sample is used, the pan value the relative amplitude of one channel respect the other.

A value of zero means centered, negative values move the panoramic to the left, positive to the right.

Examples:
pan=-30.5
pan=0
pan=43
floating point
0.0
-100 to 100 %
width

Only operational for stereo samples, width defines the amount of channel mixing applied to play the sample.

A width value of 0 makes a stereo sample play as if it were mono (adding both channels and compensating for the resulting volume change). A value of 100 will make the stereo sample play as original.

Any value in between will mix left and right channels with a part of the other, resulting in a narrower stereo field image.

Negative width values will reverse left and right channels.

Examples:
width=100 // stereo
width=0 // play this stereo sample as mono
width=50 // mix 50% of one channel with the other

floating point
0.0
-100 to 100 %
position

Only operational for stereo samples, position defines the position in the stereo field of a stereo signal, after channel mixing as defined in the width opcode.


A value of zero means centered, negative values move the panoramic to the left, positive to the right.


Examples:
// mix both channels and play the result at left
width=0 position=-100

// make the stereo image narrower and play it
// slightly right
width=50 position=30

floating point
0.0
-100 to 100 %
amp_keytrack
Amplifier keyboard tracking (change in amplitude per key) in dB.

Examples:
amp_keytrack=-1.4
amp_keytrack=3
floating point
0 dB
-96 to 12 dB
amp_keycenter
Center key for amplifier keyboard tracking. In this key, the amplifier keyboard tracking will have no effect.

Examples:
amp_keycenter=60
amp_keycenter=48
integer
60
0 to 127

amp_veltrack

Amplifier velocity tracking, represents how much the amplitude changes with incoming note velocity.

Volume changes with incoming velocity in a concave shape according to the following expression:

Amplitude(dB) = 20 log (127^2 / Velocity^2)

The amp_velcurve_N opcodes allow overriding the default velocity curve.

Examples:
amp_veltrack=0
amp_veltrack=100

floating point
100 %
-100 to 100 %
amp_velcurve_1
amp_velcurve_127

User-defined amplifier velocity curve. This opcode range allows defining a specific curve for the amplifier velocity. The value of the opcode indicates the normalized amplitude (0 to 1) for the specified velocity.

The player will interpolate lineraly between specified opcodes for unspecified ones:

amp_velcurve_1=0.2 amp_velcurve_3=0.3
// amp_velcurve_2 is calculated to 0.25

If amp_velcurve_127 is not specified, the player will assign it the value of 1.

Examples:
// linear, compressed dynamic range
// amplitude changes from 0.5 to 1
amp_velcurve_1=0.5

floating point
standard curve (see amp_veltrack)
0 to 1
amp_random
Random volume for the region, in decibels.

Examples:
amp_random=10
amp_random=3
floating point
0
0 to 24 dB
rt_decay
The volume decay amount when the region is set to play in release trigger mode, in decibels per second since note-on message.

Examples:
rt_decay=6.5
floating point
0 dB
0 to 200 dB
output
The stereo output number for this region.
If the player doesn't feature multiple outputs, this opcode is ignored.

Examples:
output=0
output=4
integer
0
0 to 1024
gain_ccN

Gain applied on MIDI control N, in decibels.

Examples:
gain_cc1=12

floating point
0
-144 to 48 dB
xfin_lokey
xfin_hikey

Fade in control.

xfin_lokey and xfin_hikey define the fade-in keyboard zone for the region.

The volume of the region will be zero for keys lower than or equal to xfin_lokey, and maximum (as defined by the volume opcode) for keys greater than or equal to xfin_hikey.

Examples:
xfin_lokey=c3 xfin_hikey=c4

integer
xfin_lokey=0
xfin_hikey=0
0 to 127
C-1 to G9
xfout_lokey
xfout_hikey

Fade out control.

xfout_lokey and xfout_hikey define the fade-out keyboard zone for the region.

The volume of the region will be maximum (as defined by the volume opcode) for keys lower than or equal to xfout_lokey, and zero for keys greater than or equal to xfout_hikey.

Examples:
xfout_lokey=c5 xfout_hikey=c6

integer
xfout_lokey=127
xfout_hikey=127
0 to 127
C-1 to G9
xf_keycurve

Keyboard crossfade curve for the region. Values can be:

gain: Linear gain crossfade. This setting is best when crossfading phase-aligned material. Linear gain crossfades keep constant amplitude during the crossfade, preventing clipping.

power: Equal-power RMS crossfade. This setting works better to mix very different material, as a constant power level is kept during the crossfade.

text
power
gain, power
xfin_lovel
xfin_hivel

Fade in control.

xfin_lovel and xfin_hivel define the fade-in velocity range for the region.

The volume of the region will be zero for velocities lower than or equal to xfin_lovel, and maximum (as defined by the volume opcode) for velocities greater than or equal to xfin_hivel.

Examples:
xfin_lovel=0 xfin_hivel=127

integer
xfin_lovel=0
xfin_hivel=0
0 to 127
xfout_lovel
xfout_hivel

Fade out control.

xfout_lokey and xfout_hikey define the fade-out velocity range for the region.

The volume of the region will be maximum (as defined by the volume opcode) for velocities lower than or equal to xfout_lovel, and zero for velocities greater than or equal to xfout_hivel.

Examples:
xfout_lovel=0 xfout_hivel=127

integer
xfout_lokey=127
xfout_hikey=127
0 to 127
xf_velcurve

Velocity crossfade curve for the region. Values can be:

gain: Linear gain crossfade. This setting is best when crossfading phase-aligned material. Linear gain crossfades keep constant amplitude during the crossfade, preventing clipping.

power: Equal-power RMS crossfade. This setting works better to mix very different material, as a constant power level is kept during the crossfade.

text
power
gain, power
xfin_loccN
xfin_hiccN

Fade in control.

xfin_loccN and xfin_hiccN set the range of values in the MIDI continuous controller N which will perform a fade-in in the region.

The volume of the region will be zero for values of the MIDI continuous controller N lower than or equal to xfin_loccN, and maximum (as defined by the volume opcode) for values greater than or equal to xfin_hiccN.

Examples:
xfin_locc1=64 xfin_hicc1=127

integer
0
0 to 127
xfout_loccN
xfout_hiccN

Fade out control.

xfout_loccN and xfout_hiccN set the range of values in the MIDI continuous controller N which will perform a fade-out in the region.

The volume of the region will be maximum (as defined by the volume opcode) for values of the MIDI continuous controller N lower than or equal to xfout_loccN, and zero for values greater than or equal to xfout_hiccN.

Examples:
xfout_locc1=64 xfout_hicc1=127

integer
0
0 to 127
xf_cccurve

MIDI controllers crossfade curve for the region. Values can be:

gain: Linear gain crossfade. This setting is best when crossfading phase-aligned material. Linear gain crossfades keep constant amplitude during the crossfade, preventing clipping.

power: Equal-power RMS crossfade. This setting works better to mix very different material, as a constant power level is kept during the crossfade.

text
power
gain, power
Amplifier EG
ampeg_delay
Amplifier EG delay time, in seconds. This is the time elapsed from note on to the start of the Attack stage.

Examples:
ampeg_delay=1.5
ampeg_delay=0
floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
ampeg_start
Amplifier EG start level, in percentage.

Examples:
ampeg_start=20
ampeg_start=100
floating point
0 %
0 to 100 %
ampeg_attack
Amplifier EG attack time, in seconds.

Examples:
ampeg_attack=1.2
ampeg_attack=0.1
floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
ampeg_hold
Amplifier EG hold time, in seconds. During the hold stage, EG output will remain at its maximum value.

Examples:
ampeg_hold=1.5
ampeg_hold=0.1
floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
ampeg_decay

Amplifier EG decay time, in seconds.


Examples:
ampeg_decay=1.5
ampeg_decay=3

floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
ampeg_sustain
Amplifier EG sustain level, in percentage.

Examples:
ampeg_sustain=40.34
ampeg_sustain=10
floating point
100 %
0 to 100 %
ampeg_release
Amplifier EG release time (after note release), in seconds.

Examples:
ampeg_release=1.34
ampeg_release=2
floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
ampeg_vel2delay
Velocity effect on amplifier EG delay time, in seconds.

Examples:
ampeg_vel2delay=1.2
ampeg_vel2delay=0.1

Delay time will be calculated as

delay time = ampeg_delay
+ ampeg_vel2delay * velocity / 127
floating point
0 seconds
-100 to 100 seconds
ampeg_vel2attack
Velocity effect on amplifier EG attack time, in seconds.

Examples:
ampeg_vel2attack=1.2
ampeg_vel2attack=0.1

Attack time will be calculated as

attack time = ampeg_attack
+ ampeg_vel2attack * velocity / 127
floating point
0 seconds
-100 to 100 seconds
ampeg_vel2hold
Velocity effect on amplifier EG hold time, in seconds.

Examples:
ampeg_vel2hold=1.2
ampeg_vel2hold=0.1

Hold time will be calculated as

hold time = ampeg_hold
+ ampeg_vel2hold * velocity / 127
floating point
0 seconds
-100 to 100 seconds
ampeg_vel2decay
Velocity effect on amplifier EG decay time, in seconds.

Examples:
ampeg_vel2decay=1.2
ampeg_vel2decay=0.1

Decay time will be calculated as

decay time = ampeg_decay
+ ampeg_vel2decay * velocity / 127
floating point
0 seconds
-100 to 100 seconds
ampeg_vel2sustain
Velocity effect on amplifier EG sustain level, in percentage.

Examples:
ampeg_vel2sustain=30
ampeg_vel2sustain=-30

Sustain level will be calculated as

sustain level= ampeg_sustain
+ ampeg_vel2sustain

The result will be clipped to 0~100%.
floating point
0%
-100 % to 100 %
ampeg_vel2release
Velocity effect on amplifier EG release time, in seconds.

Examples:
ampeg_vel2release=1.2
ampeg_vel2release=0.1

Release time will be calculated as

release time = ampeg_release
+ ampeg_vel2release * velocity / 127
floating point
0 seconds
-100 to 100 seconds
ampeg_delayccN
Amplifier EG delay time added on MIDI control N, in seconds.

Examples:
ampeg_delaycc20=1.5
ampeg_delaycc1=0
floating point
0 seconds
-100 to 100 seconds
ampeg_startccN
Amplifier EG start level added on MIDI control N, in percentage.

Examples:
ampeg_startcc20=20
ampeg_startcc1=100
floating point
0 %
-100 to 100 %
ampeg_attackccN
Amplifier EG attack time added on MIDI control N, in seconds.

Examples:
ampeg_attackcc20=1.2
ampeg_attackcc1=0.1
floating point
0 seconds
-100 to 100 seconds
ampeg_holdccN
Amplifier EG hold time added on MIDI control N, in seconds.

Examples:
ampeg_holdcc20=1.5
ampeg_holdcc1=0.1
floating point
0 seconds
-100 to 100 seconds
ampeg_decayccN

Amplifier EG decay time added on MIDI control N, in seconds.


Examples:
ampeg_decaycc20=1.5
ampeg_decaycc1=3

floating point
0 seconds
-100 to 100 seconds
ampeg_sustainccN
Amplifier EG sustain level added on MIDI control N, in percentage.

Examples:
ampeg_sustaincc20=40.34
ampeg_sustaincc1=10
floating point
100 %
-100 to 100 %
ampeg_releaseccN
Amplifier EG release time added on MIDI control N, in seconds.

Examples:
ampeg_releasecc20=1.34
ampeg_releasecc1=2
floating point
0 seconds
-100 to 100 seconds
Amplifier LFO
amplfo_delay
The time before the Amplifier LFO starts oscillating, in seconds.

Examples:
amplfo_delay=1
amplfo_delay=0.4
floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
amplfo_fade
Amplifier LFO fade-in effect time.

Examples:
amplfo_fade=1
amplfo_fade=0.4
floating point
0 seconds
0 to 100 seconds
amplfo_freq
Amplifier LFO frequency, in hertz.

Examples:
amplfo_freq=0.4
amplfo_freq=1.3
floating point
0 Hertz
0 to 20 hertz
amplfo_depth
Amplifier LFO depth, in decibels.

Examples:
amplfo_depth=1
amplfo_depth=4
floating point
0 dB
-10 to 10 dB
amplfo_depthccN
Amplifier LFO depth when MIDI continuous controller N is received, in decibels.

Examples:
amplfo_depthcc1=100
amplfo_depthcc32=400
floating point
0 dB
-10 to 10 dB
amplfo_depthchanaft
Amplifier LFO depth when channel aftertouch MIDI messages are received, in cents.

Examples:
amplfo_depthchanaft=100
amplfo_depthchanaft=400
floating point
0 dB
-10 to 10 dB
amplfo_depthpolyaft
Amplifier LFO depth when polyphonic aftertouch MIDI messages are received, in cents.

Examples:
amplfo_depthpolyaft=100
amplfo_depthpolyaft=400
floating point
0 dB
-10 to 10 dB
amplfo_freqccN
Amplifier LFO frequency change when MIDI continuous controller N is received, in hertz.

Examples:
amplfo_freqcc1=5
amplfo_freqcc1=-12
floating point
0 hertz
-200 to 200 hertz
amplfo_freqchanaft
Amplifier LFO frequency change when channel aftertouch MIDI messages are received, in hertz.

Examples:
amplfo_freqchanaft=10
amplfo_freqchanaft=-40
floating point
0 hertz
-200 to 200 hertz
amplfo_freqpolyaft
Amplifier LFO frequency change when polyphonic aftertouch MIDI messages are received, in hertz.

Examples:
amplfo_freqpolyaft=10
amplfo_freqpolyaft=-4
floating point
0 hertz
-200 to 200 hertz
Equalizer
eq1_freq
eq2_freq
eq3_freq
Frequency of the equalizer band, in Hertz.

Examples:
eq1_freq=80 eq2_freq=1000 eq3_freq=4500
floating point
eq1_freq=50
eq2_freq=500
eq3_freq=5000
0 to 30000 Hz
eq1_freqccN
eq2_freqccN
eq3_freqccN

Frequency change of the equalizer band when MIDI continuous control N messages are received, in Hertz.

Examples:
eq1_freqcc1=80

floating point
0
-30000 to 30000 Hz
eq1_vel2freq
eq2_vel2freq
eq3_vel2freq

Frequency change of the equalizer band with MIDI velocity, in Hertz.

Examples:
eq1_vel2freq=1000

floating point
0
-30000 to 30000 Hz
eq1_bw
eq2_bw
eq3_bw
Bandwidth of the equalizer band, in octaves.

Examples:
eq1_bw=1 eq2_bw=0.4 eq3_bw=1.4
floating point
1 octave
0.001 to 4 octaves
eq1_bwccN
eq2_bwccN
eq3_bwccN
Bandwidth change of the equalizer band when MIDI continuous control N messages are received, in octaves.

Examples:
eq1_bwcc29=1.3
floating point
0
-4 to 4 octaves
eq1_gain
eq2_gain
eq3_gain
Gain of the equalizer band, in decibels.

Examples:
eq1_gain=-3 eq2_gain=6 eq3_gain=-6
floating point
0 dB
-96 to 24 dB
eq1_gainccN
eq2_gainccN
eq3_gainccN
Gain change of the equalizer band when MIDI continuous control N messages are received, in decibels.

Examples:
eq1_gaincc23=-12
floating point
0 dB
-96 to 24 dB
eq1_vel2gain
eq2_vel2gain
eq3_vel2gain

Gain change of the equalizer band with MIDI velocity, in decibels.

Examples:
eq1_vel2gain=12

floating point
0
-96 to 24 dB
Effects
effect1
Level of effect1 send, in percentage (reverb in sfz).

Examples:
effect1=100
floating point
0
0 to 100 %
effect2
Level of effect2 send, in percentage (chorus in sfz).

Examples:
effect2=100
floating point
0
0 to 100 %

Examples

Example .sfz definition files showing every opcode functionality can be found here.

Version: 1.02, Last updated on: 10/1/2010

Cakewalk // DevXchange // sfz File Format
Copyright © 2014 Cakewalk, Inc. All rights reserved
Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Legal | Contact Us
share on Facebook share on Twitter print bookmark CakeTV Cakewalk blog